From Boy’s Life to Animal Torture to Ecology

The promise held in each Boy’s Life magazine was something I eagerly awaited for each month when I was a young man of eleven or twelve. It was not the articles (which I never read); it was not the jokes in the back (which I did read). It was the advertisements in the back that opened a world of possibilities that set my imagination running wild. For example, you could order x-ray glasses that would let you see through things (even clothes!). Continue reading From Boy’s Life to Animal Torture to Ecology

The Phenomenology of Vision Correction: an analytic plea for help

Optometry is supposed to be a science. But it is not. No dear reader it is a primitive branch of phenomenology. And as such I am calling on the help of phenomenologists everywhere to rescue this orphan child of human thought. I’ve suspected there was something wrong for a long time. Visiting the optometrist has always filled me with dread. A deep, soul sucking dread—the kind of angst reserved for archetypal fears and terrors. Why you ask? Why fear these kindly men and women who want nothing more than to improve your eyesight and give you confidence as you navigate through life’s visual hazards and joys? It’s because they strip me of science. They leave me naked on the rack of moribund uncertainty. Continue reading The Phenomenology of Vision Correction: an analytic plea for help

Take the Worldwide Flood Literally . . . A short short story

(Note: All place names have been translated from Adamic to Modern 21st Century English).

Noah stared at Japheth in horror. His voice shook a little, “What do you mean an Opossum escaped at our last stop?” Noah was angry. “YOU KNOW ALL THE MARSUPIALS ARE SUPPOSE TO GET DROPPED IN AUSTRAILIA!.” It was another blunder in a long series of blunders. Sailing around the earth dropping off the animals in their appropriate habitat had been hard, and he only dimly understood why it had to be done, but a marsupial in North America was going to get him in trouble. Continue reading Take the Worldwide Flood Literally . . . A short short story

Explaining fossils: Many worlds smashed together to make this one

I keep hearing that fossils came from some other creations out there in the far reaches of space–that our Earth is a conglomerate of the remnants of these previous creations. My kids have actually heard this in seminary. Apparently the story goes something like this: God made lots of worlds though special acts of creation. Then to make this Earth he took all these other creations and put them together into this one. This story is nice because it explains how come we have fossils millions of years old on a earth that is just a few thousand years old. It answers the age old question, “How do we get rid of Godless evolution.” So dinosaurs lived in these extra solar planets which furnished the material for this earth. The great thing about armchair speculation like this is that you don’t have to deal with any messy things like data and evidence. Continue reading Explaining fossils: Many worlds smashed together to make this one

Guest Blogging

Just in case you want to get more of my blogging (ha ha). I’ve been asked to be a two week guest blogger over at By Common Consent (http://www.bycommonconsent.com/).

My brain and me

For three weeks over a Christmas holiday, my children and I had been working on a computer game called Riven. We were stuck. The game involved wondering through a world picking up clues, opening hidden passageways, finding codes to open locked doors into other worlds. However, for the last three days we had been . . . → Read More: My brain and me

Alienation Nation

One of the plagues of modern life, as Hegel and Marx pointed out, is alienation. We are alienated in several ways. First, we are alienated from each other. Economist, Jane Jacobs believes we are heading into a new Dark Age, because of the collapse of community. We don’t know our neighbors. We drive long . . . → Read More: Alienation Nation

In trees

I’m starting a series of threads on the environment. This sets the stage for my leanings.

We lived in Winton, California in a house along a country road that carved through an active San Joaquin Valley agricultural area. There were deep almond orchards to either side of the house and a sizeable sweet-potato field . . . → Read More: In trees

Darwinism is just too dang harsh to be good theology

In early 19th century France there lived an ambitious Polish mathematician and Hermeticist named Józef Hoené-Wronski. Wronski is most famous for guiding the enigmatic mystic Eliphas Levi in his first ventures into the Kabbalah. But that’s not why I’m bringing him up. In utter secrecy, Wronski fashioned a machine called the prognométre that he . . . → Read More: Darwinism is just too dang harsh to be good theology